Review: East West Street; On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes against Humanity by Philippe Sands (2016) Assessment 9 out of 10

This is a great book. It reads like a thriller. It is at the same time a study of legal theory, territorial and urban history and a multiple cross generational biography. The legal theory concerns the formulation in international law of crimes against humanity and genocide. Both can be committed by states, but are visited Continue reading Review: East West Street; On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes against Humanity by Philippe Sands (2016) Assessment 9 out of 10

Cycling between churches in Norfolk (1)

Catherine’s wedding on Saturday 12 September went wonderfully in the North Norfolk sunshine. On the Sunday after cricket on the beach Anne and I moved to Worthing on the mill stream of the Black Water just before it joins the River Wensum. I did try to swim in the mill stream, but the water level Continue reading Cycling between churches in Norfolk (1)

South East Asia (mostly) by Bike Part 2 Luang Prabang to Hanoi

We left Luang Prabang by van. Unwisely, I offered to sit in the back of the van and, as the journey continued, felt increasingly travel-sick. It was a good road to avoid cycling on, as road and landscape had been desecrated by China Power damming the river valley. From mid-morning we were back on Bikes Continue reading South East Asia (mostly) by Bike Part 2 Luang Prabang to Hanoi

South East Asia (mostly) by Bike Part 1 Chiang Rai to Luang Prabang

Fleeing the Atlantic storms in January and February, Anne and I travelled extensively in SE Asia. Initially, we flew to Chiang Rai in NE Thailand, where we enjoyed a couple of tourist days. We had arranged to meet our friend, Jill, who joined us with two companions during a break in their course on yin Continue reading South East Asia (mostly) by Bike Part 1 Chiang Rai to Luang Prabang

Angkor Wat; Cycling through a Sacred Landscape

Angkor Wat is a truly impressive world heritage site. The central temple covers 1.6 sq km, apparently the world’s largest religious shrine. However it is only the most visited place in a sacred landscape, comprising 1,000 temples and shrines, and extending in an archaeological park over 1,000 sq km, some eight times the size of Continue reading Angkor Wat; Cycling through a Sacred Landscape